Decanos

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Decanos [ˈdɛ ka nos], Ver. Decan, son of Keadau 2e, was emperor of Caďinas from 1480 to 1507.

He is best known for the conquest of Aránicer, the ancient southern kingdom of the Central peoples. Once a peer of Caďinas, and indeed the first to clear its swath of Eretald from the Munkhâshi, but by Decanos’ reign it was dwarfed by the Empire. The Caďinorians had long viewed it as an annoyance, accusing it of harboring dissidents as well as gouging them on trade with Axunai. Many felt that it was long past time for this thorn in the side to be conquered and annexed.

Decanos had another idea: a peaceful merger of the two realms. He approached the Arániceri king Durririȟ and asked, “Are we not one people, with one glorious history, one great destiny? Shall we not worship each other’s gods and rule together, and shall our children not marry, and produce the great race which will rule the world?”

Durririȟ knew that it was unwise to simply reject the offer; he made what he thought would be a counter-offer impossible to accept: that as a show of good faith, the Caďinorians should begin to worship the gods of Aránicer— Aežon, Aelëa, and their pantheon. When this was done, and temples to these gods had been built in Ctesifon, he would accept Decanos’ offer.

Decanos immediately ordered the Caďinorian priests to begin this transformation. Suitably grand temples were built in the capital, and the people were instructed to worship the “First Pantheon” headed by Aežon. In two years, in 1497, Decanos returned to Aránicer, accompanied by a hundred priests dedicated to the First Pantheon, and demanded that Durririȟ honor his promise.

Durririȟ refused; he believed that submission would mean that Aránicer would merely become a province of the empire. Decanos invaded; for two years the two monarchs led their armies back and forth across the south of Eretald. Finally Decanos’ siege of Durririȟ's capital broke the city's spirit, and it accepted Caďinorian rule. Durririȟ surrendered a month later.

Decanos declared that he would generously follow the terms he had originally offered. Durririȟ was to be styled atrabion (emperor), and would live in Decanos’ own palace (where of course Decanos could keep a close eye on him); both realms would worship the same gods; two of Durririȟ's daughters were married to Decanos’ sons, while Durririȟ’s son Aiďopeos married one of Decanos’ daughters. Arániceri nobles were confirmed in their titles.

It was soon clear that these gestures were to be the only result of the “merger”. Caďinorian troops occupied Aránicer; many Arániceri nobles were found disloyal and replaced with Caďinorians (to add insult to injury, the formal charges specified that their disloyalty was to Decanos and Durririȟ). And though some attempt was made to build temples to the First Pantheon in other cities, there was much more of an effort to spread the worship of the Caďinorian gods in the south. After only a year, it was announced that Durririȟ had “retired” as co-emperor; it was also clear that Aiďopeos would be nothing but a noble, though he was allowed to remain in Aránicer.

Even today, a primeto Decanei (an offer of Decanos) means a deal that sounds fair, but conceals ruination.

Preceded by:
Keadau 2e
Decanos
1480-1507
Succeeded by:
Aeluťmeďos